What to put on ulceration to help it heal? - Vascular Birthmarks Foundation Forum
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  #1  
Old 03-03-2009, 03:55 PM
mrssuperspy mrssuperspy is offline
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Default What to put on ulceration to help it heal?

So, whether my daughter's H is "ulcerated" or not is yet to be determined. However, it is open and raw looking. I don't *think* she is in pain from it now, though. She does seem to be hurting if she bonks her head on my shoulder - as they are prone to do when trying to hold up their little heads. However, I'd like it to heal as I'm worried about infection and future pain.

The ped derm has us putting Vaseline on it. All I can see that this is doing is keeping it really moist and keeping scabs from forming. The sores are growing larger by the day. Isn't there anything that will actually heal the sores? Is laser treatment the only option?

Thanks for any thoughts or advice!
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  #2  
Old 03-03-2009, 05:30 PM
mamatomaysie mamatomaysie is offline
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I'm so sorry the sores are still growing! Moist wounds heal best, we used Aquaphor and it worked- after a week of constant application her ulcer was nearly healed. I really recommend the Aquaphor.
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  #3  
Old 03-04-2009, 06:38 PM
CarrieChris CarrieChris is offline
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ULCER CARE INSTRUCTIONS
By Gregory Levitin, MD and Carrie Smith, LPN
Ulceration of Infantile hemangiomas occurs in up to 15% of patients.
Ulcerations cause significant pain and put the patient at risk for infection.
This publication is written as a resource for the care of ulcerated
hemangiomas.
The National Organization of Vascular Anomalies and the Vascular Birthmark Foundation
has approved this information as supplemental information for the care of ulcerated
hemangiomas. Please discuss this document with your physician.
NOVA
Treating an ulcerated hemangioma is a very challenging task. It can be physically and
emotionally hard for both you and your child. Please remember that you are helping your
child. If you do not do this, your child can develop a wound infection and the ulceration will
not heal.
FREQUENCY: You should clean and change the dressing for your child’s ulcer ____times
per day.
* In some cases, your doctor may recommend giving your child pain medication _____minutes
prior to the wound care. NOTE: This will not make the dressing change pain free, just less
painful. If your child has little or no pain, you may not need to give any medication.
PREPARATION: Wash your hands thoroughly. Gather all supplies that will be needed and
assemble in an accessible area. Put gloves on prior to opening any sterile materials that will
touch the wound.
CLEANING: To effectively clean the area, first wet the area with saline or sterile water.
Using your fingertips use a gentle skin cleanser to slowly wash only the superficial layer of the
ulceration. Do not try to scrub off any debris as this may cause bleeding. Rinse the area by
either gently patting the wound with a wet gauze, or by dripping saline or sterile water over the
wound.
After the area is cleansed, you will need to pat the area dry. Use a gauze pad or a clean, dry
soft cloth.
WOUND DRESSING: You may or may not need to cover the ulceratation. If you do not
need to cover the area, you are done! Clean up your supplies and wash your hands. If you do
need the cover the area please do so in the following manner:
1. For wet-to-dry dressing care, choose an appropriately sized gauze dressing that will most
adequately cover the ulcerated area. First dampen the gauze with saline or sterile water and
squeeze out any excess.
2. Unfold the dressing and gently lay it over the entire ulceration so all exposed areas are now
covered.
3. If your doctor recommends an ointment, then use a gloved hand or Q-tip to apply a uniform
layer over the ulcerated area. Remember that more is not necessarily better! A thin layer is all
that you need unless otherwise instructed.
OUTER DRESSING: For the outer layer cover
1. For wet-to-dry dressing care, cover the wet gauze dressing with an equal sized dry gauze
dressing.
2. If your doctor recommends a non-stick dressing, apply directly over the ulceration.
OTHER INSTRUCTIONS:
__________________________________________________ ______________________
__________________________________________________ ______________________
__________________________________________________ ______________________
TAPE: to keep the dressing intact, cover the dressing with a generous piece of tape; this
should adequately cover the dressing with an ample area to adhere to the skin. A good rule of
thumb is to use a piece of tape that is twice as long as the bandage ( i.e. to cover a 4 x 4 gauze,
use an 8 inch long piece of tape).
WHAT TO LOOK FOR: Watch for any signs of infections and bleeding. If you notice
colorful drainage, foul odor, surrounding redness or anything unusual, please call your doctor
immediately.
BLEEDING: If your child’s ulcer begins to bleed, apply direct pressure with a gauze pad for
______ minutes to stop the bleeding. No peeking! If it is still bleeding after _____ minutes,
call your doctor immediately or go to your local emergency room.
*This information is in no way intended to preclude any medical treatment your physician has prescribed for the
management of an ulcerated hemangioma, but these suggestions have been helpful for many parents of children
with ulcerated hemangiomas.
For More information contact
The Vascular Birthmark Foundation
PO Box 106 Latham, NY 12110
www.birthmark.org
National Organization of Vascular Anomalies
8711 – 104 Six Forks Road PMB 126 Raleigh NC 27614
www.novanews.org
Supplies needed to properly care for your child’s ulcer
_____ Tape (2 inch paper tape is best)
_____ Gloves
_____ Gauze Pads (2x2 as well as 4x 4)
_____ Dressing to directly cover the ulcerated area. (An Adaptic dressing by Johnson and
Johnson is a non-stick dressing that can be used very effectively. You will need to
cover this with a different type of gauze-type dressing since tape will not stick
Adaptic)
_____ Q-tips
_____ Skin Cleanser (liquid Cetaphil)
_____ Water (Bottled sterile saline or sterile water. Do not use tap water.)
_____ Pain medication- This can reduce pain but will not eliminate it. There are many
side effects to pain medications, so use only if necessary. Your child will cry
regardless of taking pain medication or not.
_____ Topical medication if ordered by your child’s doctor. (example: Regranex)
_____ Ointment- Use only if ordered by your child’s doctor. You should only apply this
to dry / scaly areas on the hemangioma, or on mild / superficial ulcerations. Use
only on affected areas, as continual use can cause surrounding skin to break down
further. The most common recommended ointments are Aquafor and Bacitracin.
_____ Other
__________________________________________________ ______________________
__________________________________________________ ______________________
__________________________________________________ ______________________
You can purchase most of these supplies at your local pharmacy. You may need to contact
your local home medical supply company as well if you are having trouble finding the items
you need.
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  #4  
Old 03-04-2009, 06:42 PM
CarrieChris CarrieChris is offline
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Posts: 63
Default Ulcer care

Please read above on how to care for your child's ulcer. Also, we used aquaphor on the ulcerated area only. Don't put it on the surrounding skin or it could cause additional break down. There are several creams / ointments on the market. Ask your childs doctor which would be best. Also, you could email Dr. Serena via this website for his advice. Our daughter had a horrible ulceration and he healed hers using Mist Therapy. She also had an open sore after her reconstructive surgery and we used Suile Ointment and it healed in five days.

Carrie
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Bella healing ulcer.jpg (29.4 KB, 16 views)

Last edited by CarrieChris : 03-04-2009 at 06:44 PM. Reason: add picture
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  #5  
Old 03-04-2009, 07:23 PM
mrssuperspy mrssuperspy is offline
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Thank you so much! That was very helpful!
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